Winning the Marketing Match Point: 3 Tips for Accurate Location-Based Advertising

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Winning the Marketing Match Point: 3 Tips for Accurate Location-Based Advertising
Paul Thompson

Accuracy is paramount when dealing with location-based marketing, due to the fact that if your location starting point is incorrect, then everything that follows will be exponentially flawed. As Paul Thompson (pictured below), VP EMEA, Blis, explains, this is the most common error that marketers fail prey to when working with or using location to build and define audiences.

Just as on the tennis court, accuracy can mean the difference between devastating disappointment and international victory, as Nadal and Federer know all too well after this year’s Australian Open.

In our world, Blis defines accuracy as how close the targeted location is to the actual location, accuracy can precipitate booming business success and generate an abundance of new customers. A variance of just one decimal point in the resolution of GPS data can be the difference between 111km or 11km or 11m.

So, how can advertisers guarantee that they’re hitting a winner every time?

Accuracy & positioning

Hitting an accurate shot in tennis requires a solid contact with the ball and sufficient follow-through – all of which depend on positioning. A tennis player may have a perfect forehand but, if they’re not in the right location, that very same swing could put the ball into the net or outside the backline.

Successful location-based marketing, too, depends on accuracy or, more specifically, knowing exactly where your customers are and where they go. Faulty location data can mislead marketers, causing them to misunderstand their consumers or target the wrong audience altogether. A restaurant chain in Paris, for instance, could be using mistaken data to repeatedly deliver ads to an individual living in London who has no intention of ever visiting France.

How can brands make sure they’re reaping the full benefits of high-quality, accurate location data?

1. Clean up the data that’s in your court

Online activity and real-world travels provide troves of insightful data about consumers, from where they like to shop to what they pass on their morning commute.

But more data isn’t always better data; and a lot of what’s collected and sold today is highly inaccurate. Sometimes, this is due to technical glitches and corrupted data. Other times, it’s a direct result of criminal activity. Either way, brands could be wasting valuable campaign spend as a result.

Brands can avoid the adverse effects by working with partners who take fraud and inaccuracy seriously, vowing to get rid of anything that looks suspicious. Partners not only need to be able to spot bad data and remove it; they should also know how to use multiple data points to mitigate the sample bias.

2. Craft a winning team with multiple data sources

Location data tells us a lot about who we are, revealing where we like to go and what we like to do. But marketing is not a game of singles: pairing location data with other valuable data sources and insights will make it even more powerful.

For instance, location data can enable a luxury hotel brand to identify potential customers: people living in London who travel frequently and stay in high-end accommodation around Europe. Combining that information with multiple data sources can enable that hotel brand to segment their audience further: instead of reaching out to all European travellers, they can deliver ads to those who have high disposable income and who’ve recently been looking online at ski resorts in the Alps.

Layering data sources in this way will boost the power of location insights and increase the effectiveness of ad campaigns.

3. Request a good umpire: third-party validation

Once the ad has been served, based on carefully-filtered data from variety of sources, what more can be done to ensure accuracy?

Brands can continue to put accuracy at the forefront of their efforts by requesting a third-party validator to carefully assess the accuracy of each campaign. Unfortunately, the quality of location verification still lags behind fraud, viewability, and content verification. Nonetheless, third-party validation can help brands hold their business partners accountable and make sure they are reaching out to the right audiences.

As more brands request campaign validation, or choose partners who already work closely with third-party validators, we’ll see the industry clean itself up and move towards greater accuracy.

Accurate location-based marketing

Location reveals much more than the whims, intents, or aspirations of consumers who browse products online. It shows us their realities: the things consumers actually do and the places they really go. Location-based insights, therefore, can enable brands to focus on relevant and hyper-targeted audience segments, delivering ads at the most opportune time and place.

By filtering out inaccurate data, validating campaigns, and pairing location-based insights with other valuable information on consumers, brands will be well positioned to take home the title. And when they win over consumers, they’ll benefit from higher conversation rates and greater ROI.

To view the original article on ExchangeWire click here.

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Paul Thompson As CRO of Blis, Paul Thompson is responsible for leading Blis’ commercial expansion across the global alongside a team of truly talented and inspirational people. Over the last 25 years Paul’s career has seen him work in roles that cover media agency, media owner, sales, communication planning, digital media, mobile and programmatic. Paul has worked at BBH, Motive, Dentsu Aegis, Publicis, News International and Yahoo!
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Retailers’ Golden Ticket to Reviving Brick and Mortar Stores

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Retailers’ Golden Ticket to Reviving Brick and Mortar Stores

Interested in understanding how to connect mobile experiences to physical stores? Or how mobile can be the extension of a retailer’s store? Maybe you’ve wondered about the new Cost-Per-Visit metric? Look no further. Blis’ location data experts will be answering these questions on a weekly basis over the next few months in our ‘Retail Series’ which aims to equip retail marketers with the right insights and top tips to stay ahead of the game.

Following its decision to buy e-commerce company Jet.com last year, Walmart recently agreed to acquire Bonobos, a retailer with a strong online presence and generous shipping policies. If these moves weren’t sign enough that the physical and digital retail worlds are merging, Amazon’s acquisition of Whole Foods is the ultimate wake-up call.

Retailers everywhere are realizing that while brick and mortar stores are still critical, they’ll need a strong digital strategy to keep them filled with happy customers. Mobile devices are retailers’ golden ticket to connecting with consumers and reviving in-store shopping.

Understanding Consumers though Mobile

Whether they are going to work or going shopping, consumers carry their phones with them wherever they go. As a result, mobile devices provide retailers with a constant stream of valuable consumer insights. GPS and Wi-Fi data can tell retailers, for instance, whether a consumer is at a desktop at work, connected to Wi-Fi at home, or walking past a retailer’s store.

Beyond real-time location data, retailers can use historical location data to understand a consumer’s habits. For example, some consumers might visit a luxury jewelry brand on Fifth Avenue just to browse, even if they have no intention (or monetary means!) of buying. Thus, for that specific retailer, in-store visits may not indicate ideal customers. Instead, that luxury retailer can look at historical location data to identify their ideal consumers: perhaps individuals who frequently stay at the Four Seasons Hotel or regularly check in to exclusive country clubs.

But retailers shouldn’t rely on mobile data alone. By layering mobile insights with other valuable sources of data, advertisers can gain a holistic picture of their perfect audiences. Data collected from laptops, for instance, can reveal browsing histories and online shopping patterns; however, consumers won’t be opening up their laptops while shopping in stores. The trick is for retailers to match the data across devices to unique mobile device IDs. Only then will they gain a more holistic understanding of consumers and will be able to target or retarget them with products they are likely to go buy.

Driving Foot Traffic Creatively

Once they’ve gotten a clear and thorough understanding of their ideal audiences, how can retailers use mobile devices to drive foot traffic? Proximity targeting—delivering ads to consumers when they come within a certain distance of a store location—is a common approach. Retailers can maximize the power of proximity targeting by crafting unique and imaginative creatives.

For instance, advertisers can deliver ads to shoppers already in the area to tell them about an in-store sale, or offer them a coupon they can only redeem in person. Retailers can also deliver ads that feature a handy map telling consumers how to find their store.

Sometimes, targeting consumers when they are walking by a store may be a little too late. A QSR wanting to boost its 10 am breakfast crowd, for instance, may want to target consumers when they wake up around 7a and begin planning their day. Otherwise, the consumer has most likely already made their breakfast choice.

While there is no one-size-fits-all solution for retailers looking to connect with consumers and drive in-store sales, a strong mobile strategy is key. As the digital and physical worlds continue to blend, retailers must harness the insights and capabilities of mobile to reach their unique brand objectives.

Tune in next week to read all about how mobile is fast becoming the extension of a retailer’s store.

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3 Ways Retailers Can Use Mobile for Effective One-to-one Marketing

Article

3 Ways Retailers Can Use Mobile for Effective One-to-one...

Today, mobile devices are like mini retail stores we carry around in our pockets: places where consumers can browse merchandise or place orders almost instantly.

But mobile devices also give consumers something they can’t get in stores: personalized marketing. Collecting data like shopping histories and browsing patterns, mmobile devices provide retailers with detailed insight into individual consumers and a means of communicating with them directly.

How can retailers use mobile insights and capabilities to craft effective, one-to-one messaging?

1. Get personal.

Today, consumers want—and expect—ads to speak directly to them. In fact, 74% of customers feel frustrated when their online experiences aren’t personalized.

The easiest way for retailers to personalize content is by harnessing their first-party data. If a customer purchases a dress online, the brand can use what they know about her (her fashion interests, browsing history and email address) to customize subsequent content. For example, the brand can serve an ad via email that suggests a pair of shoes to go along with the new dress.

With CRM data, the retailer can see what the woman bought online, but do they know what she’s purchased elsewhere? Or what she does when she’s not shopping? This is where location data comes in. Retailers that layer location-based insights on to other sources of data can get to know where and when consumers shop at brick and mortar stores. They can also identify other behavioral patterns, including which day of the week and time of day they like to go shopping—data can enables greater levels of personalization.

Let’s say a CPG brand wants to reach out to a previous customer who hasn’t been seen in store lately. The marketers can use their knowledge of the consumer’s daily commute to deliver the ad just before he leaves work, suggesting he stop by on his way home. They may even offer him a discount on the product he previously purchased.

2. Market to individuals, not devices.

Once retailer marketers have identified their ideal audiences on mobile, they shouldn’t see phones as the only means of communication. Consumers own an average of 3.6 connected devices, so retailers should communicate with consumers across the devices they use, including tablets, laptops, desktops and addressable TV.

However, if a retailer sees a user reading political news on the tablet all day but watching cartoons in the evening, it might not be the same same person. With families and partners sharing devices at home, marketers need to make sure they are constructing nuanced consumer profiles across devices in order to reach out to individuals, not just devices.

3. Don’t be creepy.

Personalized, cross-device marketing is on the rise in part because consumers are increasingly willing to disclose their data to retailers. After all, purchase histories and location data are essential for useful or interesting ads.

But how retailers use that data is key. Consumers want to feel understood, but they don’t want to feel like ads are invasive or drawing on data that’s simply too personal and private. Marketers need to make sure they aren’t crossing any personal boundaries or making consumers feel uncomfortable.

If marketers want to turn heads or, more importantly, turn consumers into buyers, they’ll need to do more than blast out generic ads to the masses. When retailers personalize ads with these three tips, they’ll see huge improvements in campaign performance.

But how, exactly, do they measure these improvements? Find out next week when we assess the best metrics for retailers.

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Embracing the Retailer’s Dream Metric: Cost Per Visit

Article

Embracing the Retailer’s Dream Metric: Cost Per Visit

The twentieth-century American engineer and statistician W. Edwards Deming once said, “Just because you can measure everything, doesn’t mean that you should.”

This applies to retailer struggles today as marketing executives need to decide what they should measure and how. Do they care about impressions, views or click-through rates? And once they figure that out, how can they make sure their ad dollars are really working? The Partnership predicts that ad fraud will cost brands over $16 billion this year alone, while Infectious Media suggests that over half of all digital ads aren’t seen at all.

Fortunately for retailers, there’s a new metric in town—one designed to eliminate waste and increase sales. With a cost-per-visit (CPV) model, retailers pay only when a consumer sees an ad and visits a specific location. Here are four ways retailers are benefiting from this cutting-edge new metric.

1) Increased Foot Traffic

With the National Retail Federation predicting eight to 12 percent e-commerce growth this year alone, no one can deny the rapid rise of online sales. However, 85 percent of consumers still prefer to shop in brick-and-mortar stores, where 94 percent of all sales are generated. That’s why it’s vital for retailers to keep their physical stores alive and continue to enhance their in-store experiences.

With the explicit goal of bringing visitors into physical store locations, CPV is a metric for retailers wanting to increase foot traffic—and pay only for successful conversions. While there are many ways to boost in-store visits, today’s leading location data solutions use predictive location modeling. With Blis Futures, we choose to charge on a CPV-basis because we are completely confident in this approach.

2) Greater In-store Sales

Driving consumers into brick-and-mortar locations may also encourage consumers to buy more than they anticipated. It gives retailers the opportunity to upsell consumers so they need to make sure they clearly advertise their promotional pricing, point-of-purchase displays and loyalty programs. Once you have a potential customer in the store, you can push tailored messaging in real-time and create personalized promotions. As anyone that has ever been into a Target retail location can attest – you may go in for one specific item but end up unable to leave the store for less than $100! So only paying when a consumer sees an ad and then visits a physical location reaps multiples rewards for a marketer.

3) Branding Opportunities

When retailers buy ads on a cost-per-visit basis, they don’t pay if the consumer sees the ad but doesn’t come into the store. That means the retailer also benefits from ad views and branding. In fact, a consumer may see the ad and make a purchase online rather than in-store, but the marketer still pays nothing for that conversion. At Blis, we are willing to take that risk and allow marketers “free” branding messages. Our confidence in the technology behind our CPV metric allows us to think of marketers first.

4) Risk-free Investing

CPV transfers the risk from buyer to partner, so retailers don’t have to worry about wasted ad spend: They’re making a completely risk-free investment. With free branding and zero downside, retailers have nothing to lose.

When Blis became one of the first tech partners to offer the CPV model earlier this year, we sent a critical message to both retailers and the wider industry: We’re ushering in a new era of transparency and accountability in advertising.

Check back again next week when we switch gears to discuss how retailers can use mobile to boost engagement, retention and acquisition.

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